Actually, Ajoblanco is Spanish for ‘white garlic’ or literally ‘garlic white,’ and is a summer soup, made with raw almonds and bread, eaten cold, as you would gazpacho. It is usually topped with green grapes, a few drops of olive oil and some crunchy jamon (a Spanish cured ham).

  • 1 cup raw almonds (soaked in water)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 4 slices of white bread (crust removed)  soaked in 1/4 of water
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1  cup water

 

Soak the almonds in water about an hour before starting. The almonds need to be raw, this means not toasted or salted, but they do need to be peeled. It is called white gazpacho for a reason; the reason being it is white. Just wanted to make it is painfully clear.

The recipe calls for crustless bread. This is because, again, you want to preserve the whiteness of the dish (that sounds racialist, but it’s not). What you can do is cut the crusts into croutons and toast them in a frying pan with olive oil. Use them as the crunch factor in this dish, or just eat them while you cook.

In a blender, place the almonds (sans the water), the salt and the peeled garlic clove. Blend until it turns into a grainy paste. I wrote granny paste by accident and changed it, but now that I think about it, it’s a freudian slip that actually makes sense.

Add the bread, vinegar, and olive oil, blend again. Try to get it as smooth as possible at this point. It should take a few minutes so let the blender go.

Add the water and blend for a third time. At this point taste for salt levels and texture. If you wanted it soupier, add some water.

Place in the fridge for a few hours before serving. This helps the taste develop and of course get colder. This is assuming you have a fridge.

I fried up some Jamon to serve with it.

 

They make great appetizer shots.

 

 

White Gazpacho (Ajoblanco)
 
Actually, Ajoblanco is Spanish for 'white garlic' or literally 'garlic white,' and is a summer soup, made with raw almonds and bread, eaten cold, as you would gazpacho. It is usually topped with green grapes, a few drops of olive oil and some crunchy jamon (a Spanish cured ham).
Author:
Cuisine: Spanish
Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw almonds (soaked in water)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 4 slices of white bread (crust removed) soaked in ¼ of water
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup water
Instructions
  1. Soak the almonds in water about an hour before starting. The almonds need to be raw, this means not toasted or salted, but they do need to be peeled. It is called white gazpacho for a reason; the reason being it is white. Just wanted to make it is painfully clear.
  2. The recipe calls for crustless bread. This is because, again, you want to preserve the whiteness of the dish (that sounds racialist, but it's not). What you can do is cut the crusts into croutons and toast them in a frying pan with olive oil. Use them as the crunch factor in this dish, or just eat them while you cook.
  3. In a blender, place the almonds (sans the water), the salt and the peeled garlic clove. Blend until it turns into a grainy paste. I wrote granny paste by accident and changed it, but now that I think about it, it's a freudian slip that actually makes sense.
  4. Add the bread, vinegar, and olive oil, blend again. Try to get it as smooth as possible at this point. It should take a few minutes so let the blender go.
  5. Add the water and blend for a third time. At this point taste for salt levels and texture. If you wanted it soupier, add some water.
  6. Place in the fridge for a few hours before serving. This helps the taste develop and of course get colder. This is assuming you have a fridge.