Ejjeh means omelet in Arabic, and “lib el kousa” literally refers to the inside of the zucchinis. If you have already mastered the Lebanese stuffed zucchini (Kousa Mahshi), it is time to take it to the next level. My mom would make zucchini omelets (Ejjeh Bi Lib El Kousa) the day after making stuffed zucchinis. Lebanese cooking was zero-waste before it was trendy. This recipe was created to use up the leftover cores, but you don’t have to wait for discarded veggie innards, simply grate or finely chop whole zucchinis.

The What:
  • 3 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • About 2 cups diced zucchini cores
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon dried mint
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 5 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Vegetable oil for frying

 

The How: 

When you make stuffed zucchinis you are left with a lot of good vegetable guts. Zucchini cuts are not pretty but are delicious and nutritious; now you  have a recipe to use them up.

Place a large frying pan on medium heat and add the 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil. Add the onions and a pinch of black pepper, sweat until translucent.

Add the crushed garlic, sauté for 2 minutes.

Once you can smell the garlic, increase the heat to medium-high and add the zucchini to the pan. Squeeze the zucchini to remove any excess moisture. Add a generous pinch of salt and fry the zucchini for about 5 minutes, stirring constantly.

Add the dried mint to the pan by rubbing it between your palms and letting it fall onto the zucchini like a green rain. Stir it in, remove the frying pan from the heat, set aside.

Crack the eggs into a large bowl, add the parsley, cilantro, and pinch of salt, whisk until eggs are frothy. I hope I don’t have to say this, but just to be on the safe side, wash and dry your herbs before chopping.

Add the baking powder and flour, whisk until there are no lumps. Add the zucchini mixture from the frying pan and mix well. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside for 10 minutes to rest.

There are two ways to fry up the zucchini omelet: One big one (tortilla Española style) or little individual ones (latke style). I did both. With the large option the eggs get a little fluffier in the center, the small ones are easier to flip and get a little crunchier.

Place a frying pan on high heat and add enough vegetable oil to completely cover the bottom. If you are going the small individual route, place small puddles of the batter into the oil once it is hot. Flip them once they have golden brown. Repeat until batter is finished. Make sure you mix the batter well before scooping; the zucchini tends to drop to the bottom. Place on paper towel to remove excess oil, and sprinkle with salt.

If you are going the large route, make sure the oil is very hot, dump the entire batter into the really hot pan and lower the heat to low immediately. Using a wooden spoon, move the sides of the batter into the center to drain the batter from the middle.

Once it has set slightly, place a large plate over the pan and carefully flip the omelet onto the plate. Place the frying pan back onto the heat and slide the omelet back in (uncooked side down). Cook until golden brown on the other side and flip onto a plate.

 

Lebanese Zucchini Omelet (Ejjeh Bi Lib El Kousa)

Lebanese Zucchini Omelet (Ejjeh Bi Lib El Kousa)

Ejjeh means omelet in Arabic, and "lib el kousa" literally refers to the inside of the zucchinis. If you have already mastered the Lebanese stuffed zucchini (Kousa Mahshi), it is time to take it to the next level. My mom would make zucchini omelets (Ejjeh Bi Lib El Kousa) the day after making stuffed zucchinis. Lebanese cooking was zero-waste before it was trendy. This recipe was created to use up the leftover cores, but you don't have to wait for discarded veggie innards, simply grate or finely chop whole zucchinis.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • About 2 cups diced zucchini cores
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon dried mint
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 5 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

  1. Place a large frying pan on medium heat and add the 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil. Add the onions and a pinch of black pepper, sweat until translucent.
  2. Add the crushed garlic, sauté for 2 minutes.
  3. Once you can smell the garlic, increase the heat to medium-high and add the zucchini to the pan. Squeeze the zucchini to remove any excess moisture. Add a generous pinch of salt and fry the zucchini for about 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
  4. Add the dried mint to the pan by rubbing it between your palms and letting it fall onto the zucchini like a green rain. Stir it in, remove the frying pan from the heat, set aside.
  5. Crack the eggs into a large bowl, add the parsley, cilantro, and pinch of salt, whisk until eggs are frothy. I hope I don't have to say this, but just to be on the safe side, wash and dry your herbs before chopping.
  6. Add the baking powder and flour, whisk until there are no lumps. Add the zucchini mixture from the frying pan and mix well. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside for 10 minutes to rest.
  7. There are two ways to fry up the zucchini omelet: One big one (tortilla Española style) or little individual ones (latke style). I did both. With the large option the eggs get a little fluffier in the center, the small ones are easier to flip and get a little crunchier.
  8. Place a frying pan on high heat and add enough vegetable oil to completely cover the bottom. If you are going the small individual route, place small puddles of the batter into the oil once it is hot. Flip them once they have golden brown. Repeat until batter is finished. Make sure you mix the batter well before scooping; the zucchini tends to drop to the bottom. Place on paper towel to remove excess oil, and sprinkle with salt.
  9. If you are going the large route, make sure the oil is very hot, dump the entire batter into the really hot pan and lower the heat to low immediately. Using a wooden spoon, move the sides of the batter into the center to drain the batter from the middle.
  10. Once it has set slightly, place a large plate over the pan and carefully flip the omelet onto the plate. Place the frying pan back onto the heat and slide the omelet back in (uncooked side down). Cook until golden brown on the other side and flip onto a plate.
http://www.foodosopher.com/ejjeh/